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crisis. what are the consequences? welcome. i'm ali velshi. the government has paid its bills on time for 237 years and now congress is threatening to blow it. earlier this week, the ratings agency fitch threatened to downgrade america's sovereign credit rating if washington failed to resolve the issue in a timely manner. s&p downgraded america's perfect credit rating back in august of 2011. fitch didn't do it at the time. but the last time we had one of these debt ceiling debacles that embarrassment was the first downgrade of u.s. credit in history. if congress doesn't act and we default for the first time ever, the consequences are likely to be severe for all of us. federal interest costs would likely rise, business and personal borrowing costs would probably follow. it would also make the struggle to manage our historic debt levels tougher. the worst thing that can happen if you're beck lg under debt, is for your interest rate to go up. it could mean higher taxes and more cults to programs and services from the government. any hope for a controlled fix to our debt problem would be
government spending at the same time. they speak so confident, don't they? it's almost as if they forgot all about the spending cuts the president already gave them over a year ago. well, let's try to help them figure it out a little bit with a little visual and audio assistance. >> over the past two years i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion into new revenue, by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that will save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years. not counting the $400 billion already saved from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. so we've made progress. >> didn't president clinton say it was all about arithmetic? republicans can posture on the debt ceiling all they want. they know the truth. listen to john boehner two years ago. >> do you agree with administration officials and other economists that defaulting on the full faith and credit of the
by the way sends much more money to the federal government than it gets back, we just want them to be more urgent, and concerned. families that lost their houses, blocks that were destroyed. it is ridiculous that we're still debating this, especially looking at some of the congress people who are doing this. in my opinion, it is shameless, when their states were not seeing the same set of crises, they were the first to ask for resources. they should pull together, stand up, do the right thing. to me right now, at the end of a very long day i'm frustrated. i'm angry, we should all stand up for each other in times of crisis. this is so un-american in my opinion. >> newark's mayor, cory booker, gets tonight's last word. >> thank you. >> "the ed show" is up next. >>> good evening americans and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. the gop is still holding the american economy hostage, and president obama says they wouldn't collect a ransom. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> the issue here is whether or not america pays its bills. we are not a dead beat nation. >> the president dra
for gays and lesbians and a much bolder statement in many ways in mr. obama's governing philosophy from here on out. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still. just as it guided our forebearers through seneca falls and stone wall, a it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone, to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> a very big day for the president, for washington, for the country. a very exciting day if you're fascinated by the clash of political ideas. we're going to be looking at the speech as politics and poetry. the day as history and the night as culture. before we do that, let's listen to a little of stevie wonder. ♪ jamming ♪ in the middle of the makings of obama oh jamming ♪ ♪ say it louder ♪ i can't hear you ♪ in the middle of making of obama jamming ♪ ♪ yeah, yeah make some noise ♪ making things be
kathy rogers told "political" i think it is possible we would shut down the government to make sure that president obama understands that we're serious. well, i guess that would do it. we always talk about whether or not we're going to kick the can down the road. i think the mood is that we have come to the end of the road. what road? and republican congresswoman marsha blackburn of tennessee said this to msnbc's chris jansing. let me ask you if you're willing to shut the government down? >> we're looking at all the options, there is the option of government shutdown, the option of raising the debt ceiling in short-term increments. i think there is a way to avoid default if it requires shutting down portions of the government. let's look at that. >> and in his press conference, president obama quoted speaker john boehner from 2011. >> that would be a financial disaster, not only for our country but for the worldwide economy. i don't think it is a question that is even on the table. >> and the last question of his press conference, the president was asked if he may be more successful
, and the man the government reluctantly accepted as its negotiator walked out of a mountaintop cabin late this afternoon hand in hand. >> he didn't come out. we went in. and we hugged each other. and we kissed the girls and hugged them. and it's a very emotional thing. >> it was 11 days ago when the siege in northern i'd began. weaver, his wife, three kids, and a friend were found hiding in a remote cabin not far from the canadian border. weaver was wanted on charges of selling sawed-off shotguns. there was a shootout, and a federal marshal was killed. the next day weaver's wife was killed. a son killed. and a friend wounded. northern idaho is a hotbed for anti-government sentiment. and as the siege dragged on a vigil of angry supporters watched the authorities' every move. >> so bo gritz, presidential candidate that year, ended up playing this key role in ending this horrible standoff. but the standoff, it lasted for 11 days, and it did become a cause celebre for a very angry portion of the very far right anti-government fringe in this country. that was ruby ridge. less than a year later
said it's an ode to big government and you pointed out in the list, gun control, gay marriage, global warming, he not only wants to lock in every liberal agenda item, but advance it further. will he be successful? second term are notoriously not successful. >> let's add global climate warming on her, climate change. we've already passed this through the congress. it's done. is congress going to pass it? is congress going to tell the states, no, you can't put that past voter i.d. laws? only in it's bipartisan doesn't require amnesty and citizenship. gun control passed, no. i think the president was basically declaring his administration is no longer substantive achievement. it's make the democratic party and making the republicans look more extreme. taking their strength to pass positive items that pile up over in the senate never to be really considered, but give them an agenda, a view that says to the american people he's over there worried about gun control. we're worried about getting jobs. he's over there worried about trying to get gay marriage. we want prosperity for your family
do now? >> what do we do now? that is always the question, what do you do now when you have to govern? but it is not just a question that affects winners, sometimes losers of elections have to ask what do we do now? and for them the question can be harder to answer, after all, the winner in theory should do whatever they promise to voters. but the losers just watch them say no, take the republican party, they just lost the 2012 election at every federal level, they lost the presidency, at the senate, and fewer votes than democrats did in the house of representatives. but due to the way the house districts are drawn, they're still in charge. so they're in kind of a weird position. the argument lost, the american people didn't want what they were selling. but they're not out of office, their constituents want them to fight for their ideals. what do you do now? how do you balance losing the national election and losing the argument but still being in power? over the last couple of days, house republicans have been gathered in williamsburg, virginia to try to sort that out. and discussion
is all about. people who maintain an almost total skepticism about what government can accomplish for the good of this country. he talked about all the good things government does, whether it's education or it's a safety net or it's regulation when it has to be done in terms of big business. he launched all those good reasons and then he said, of course, there are people who retain a reasonable skepticism about the role of government in this country. that debate is going to continue. i thought that was an amazing effort. he's not going to win any support from the tea party. he might win though, the congressman may know better, he might be able to make some of the people who represent the suburbs who are not so far right realize this guy is not their enemy. he is somewhat to their left but he's probably as reasonable as anybody to their right in terms of politics these days. >> chris -- >> i think the battle today is between people that want government to function, want the debate to continue, and people that want to take their ball and go home and end government, shut it down, use
, like we will be this year there's something different. governing is already under way. the president has started some things that he intends to finish in his second term. sort of a sense of continuity, well informed expectation about what kind of president this is going to be and where he is likely to go. when president obama was inaugurated. first time, there was none of that certainty and expectation, right? the country and all of us were caught up in the historical enormity of the fact that the united states of america was about to swear in our first african-american president. and that eight years of republican administration under bush and cheney was coming to an end. that inauguration in 2009 was such a dramatic break from the past, toward a whole new future that i don't think anybody expects that we will have an inauguration quite as consequential as the last one. maybe ever again. but we now know, as part of the historical record, that while the whole country was marveling at the enormity of the transition we were making on inauguration night 2009 something else was going on
. as the president should know by now. the federal government cannot provide for 320 million people. and the dangerous p danger is is that mr. obama's persistent attempts to do that to redistribute prosperity will bankrupt the nation, causing pain to everyone and making it impossible for poorly educated or kiss advantaged whom he sighted to make a living. the president's address was not an urgent call to reform entitlements, provide oversight on economic abuse or even stimulate the economy. none of that was on display. so it is quite clear that the president is willing to go down in history as a crusader for social justice no matter what happens to the economic fabric of the country. he does not want to cut government spending. he does not want to reform entitlements that are now directly threatening the american treasury. unless there is a radical change in the president's thinking, few problems will be solved over the next four years. we'll simply get more of the same. and that's the memo. now for the top story tonight. we begin our coverage of the inauguration by going down to wa
. they gave to us a republic, a government of and by and for the people, entrusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed. for more of the 200 years we have had. we have learned that no union founded on the principles of liberty and equality could survive half buried. we made ourselves a new and we vowed to move forward together. together we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to see travel and commerce. schools and colleges to train our workers. together we discovered that a free market only works with your competition and fair play. together we resolve that a great nation must care for it the vulnerable and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortunes. to it all, we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority. nor have we succumb to the fictions that ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of a nation, and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility. these are constant in our character. we have always understood that when times change, so we do too. fidelity to our founding p
health care is, it's very government-controlled and it's becoming more government-controlled so it's the opposite of free enterprise capitalism. >> all that and more in just minutes away, first, manti mania. notre dame football star manti te'o in the center of a big hoax, at the the victim or in on the hoax. and a teammate calling him a liar. >> and joining us with the latest facts on this story and jack, before we get to your conversations with teammates of him, i'm curious, set the stage. what are the facts as we know it tonight? >> well, the facts are so convoluted. it's such a long, deep rabbit hole where the story comes from. the quick version is that here you have manti te'o, star linebacker, notre dame, goes on to come in second place in heisman trophy ballots. he had this girlfriend he allegedly met a few years ago, she allegedly was diagnosed with leukemia and he kind of rode this wave of this tragic love story that happened to coincide on the same day as his grandmother's died, this fictitious girlfriend passed away and he was crying on the side line of the michigan win m
these great people to this day's fantastic events. >> a president who says government can help improve the lives of everyday americans. president barack obama fits that description and so does fdr, franklin delano roosevelt. let's bringing in personal historian doug brinkley to talk more about this. you've said fdr has been on your mind a lot as we countdown to the second inauguration. tell us why. >> in 1933 in march when fdr famously said we have nothing to fear but fear itself, that's because we were in the great depression. people were really worried what was going to happen. due to the new deal, due to the first 100 days, the fdr created the ccc and tva and the alphabet the soup of the new deal. we started getting out of the great depression. but by the time he gave his second inaugural in 1937, we were still in it. similar to president obama, he inherited the great recession, was able to do t.a.r.p. and all of this. won re-election, yet, there are still millions of americans living in the poverty and the middle class is still struggling. you've got watch that you're not triumphan
suspicious about social security and government support for the elderly and spending money on medical research and then get this, suspicious about programs a, making sure that kids and poverty are getting enough to eat. this is not only deeply dishonest, it's a gross distortion, a lecture coming from a man who is responsible for a massive increase in poverty during his presidency. now, a third thing we saw from obama's press conference was how deeply misleading his facts and his claims are. for example, obama kept saying his plan would cut 4 trillion dollars in the budget in the next decade, but that claim is utterly untrue. as any number of fact checkers have pointed out the 4 trillion dollar figure comes from number one, it counts 1 trillion in cuts and reached a year ago in the budget negotiations with congress, meaning those savings are already in the bank. number two, it counts 800 billion dollars in savings and debt payments from lower deficits, as a spending cut. that's a dubious claim. number three, obama is counting a nearly 1 trillion dollar savings from more money than nobo
militants. u.s. government officials tell cnn that may not necessarily, though be the case. let's get straight to our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence working this story for us. chris, be what is the very latest that you're hearing? >> wolf, the latest that we're getting from u.s. officials is that some americans may have escaped but some may still be held by those hostage takers and they are still seeing signs perhaps of some intermittent fighting suggesting that perhaps this isn't over yet. as the hostage situation stretched to a second day, u.s. officials scrambled to find a resolution and determine the state of the americans still in militant hands. >> this incident will be resolved, we hope with a minimum loss of life. but when you deal with these relentless terrorists, life is not in any way precious to them. >> americans and other western workers were on as about when multiple militants attacked. the militants took hostage at this gas plant heavily armed with rocket grenades and forced some hostages to wear explosive vests. the militants may have t
? what are you hearing? what is the u.s. government trying to do, the military and civilian sector? >> well, right now we understand that on the diplomatic front the u.s. is letting the algerian take the leads. the algerians have voubded the compound. they are trying to negotiate with the kidnappers. we are told that in addition to this retribution that they are talking about, they are also asking for some of their prisoners who were being held by algeria and other countries to be released and sent to northern mali. they are handling that. obviously the u.s. has assets in the region and can be contemplating some type of rescue. >> elise, thank you very much. we're learning that africa is taking the lead on the military side of the crisis. let's go to our pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. chris, if needed, where could the military help come from? >> it could come from europe and even closer. a senior defense official tells me now that defense secretary leon panetta has assured americans that the u.s. military will take all necessary and proper steps to deal with this attack. w
contact with the algerian government about all of this, but still the u.s. and at least seven or eight other nations trying to work out exactly what happened, the fate of their citizens who were there, what the algerian government did and who exactly was behind this attack. this is now one of the key questions for the united states and intelligence services around the world. if this was al qaeda in north africa, which almost everyone seems to accept, it was -- what does this mean? is this a new front on the war on terror? this was by all accounts a very well-planned attack. they were heavily armed and moved several hundred into the algerian desert. this just didn't happen. who is behind all of it and what is the current threat they now pose. randi? >> algerian special forces took a whole lot of heat on thurz sd for launching the first attack to end this crisis. what are they saying about yesterday's attack now? >> you are absolutely right. how swiftly and violently the algerian forces cracked down on all of this. no question about it. the united states, britain, western allies who had
should tell them to go shove it. you can't run a government three months at a time. you have to have a long-term planning. bad for the markets. bad for the country. bad for the economy. let's make clear, definitive decisions. you lost. let's come together and compromise. pass the debt ceiling and talk about spending cuts if that's what you want to talk about. >> i want to read what "the washington post" conservative columnist had to say about the republican strategy. here's what he said. he wrote, obama's post-election arrogance and intransigence can put you in a fighting mood. i sympathize. this is what he's telling the republicans but i'm tending toward the realist view. don't force the issue when you don't have the power s. that what we're seeing with the debt kreeling in they don't have the power and maybe taking this advice from the conservative columnist? >> it's rare i agree with charles krauthammer but don't fight battles you can't win and don't go to the brink to be perceived as pulling back and therefore losing. this is not a fight they can win. it's certainly one they can
? >> that is government numbers used by republican members of the senate budget committee. it represents a whole new america. in fact, it represents a total reversal from the days of welfare reform in the mid-1990's. welfare has made an enormous come-back. there are no plans to rein it in. it is going to go up by $11 trillion. spending on welfare up $11 trillion in the next ten years. that's astronomical. >>steve: is a portion of it a sign of the times because the economy is so bad and it is hard for people to find work and they need assistance? >> absolutely not. there has been a shift in the eligibility for welfare during the obama years. more people are getting heating assistance, cell phones. you name it, you can get more of it in the obama years. point is there is no plan to rein this in. the president is adamantly opposed to any spending cuts or any reining in of these run-away programs. >>gretchen: one in six americans now on food stamps. i think one in four children, i've heard, are on food stamps. >> 19.9 million children are fed by the federal government. >>gretchen: you know what comes to
. some for congress. some measures the government can take on its own. the president will announce a crackdown on people that lie on background checks. tougher penalties for gun traffickers. better distribution of mental health records. he will ask lawmakers to pass legislation requiring universal background checks and banning assault weapons and high-capacity magazines where republican congressman bob goodlatte of west virgina suggests he will run into opposition. >> this is a very important constitutional right. we're dedicated to protecting the second amendment from that standpoint. what we want to focus on are ways to make sure that people with serious mental difficulties are kept away from firearms. >> reporter: even democrats saying the assault weapons ban in particular is a longshot. bill? bill: wendell. thank you. some morning rain there at the white house for you. wendell goler staying dry. martha? martha: some folks in law enforcement are seething over this proposed gun control law changes. they say they will not enforce those laws. in a letter that he wrote tot vice pres
, after much prodding, because i'm afraid one day the government may come after me, and i will need to use my assault weapon on u.s. soldiers that are coming to my house. they don't say it exactly that way, but that's what it always boils down to. and that's -- republicans need to understand that at the end of the day, that's just a losing argument. >> well, it's a slippery slope argument. and the danger for that for the nra essentially by saying any gun control is unacceptable, then it puts itself outside the substantive argument, and that's actually a risky strategy. i actually thought yesterday was an interesting day in american politics. i thought it was a really big, bold, comprehensive proposal by the president which is good because it gives you a narrative. if the problems are that big, you actually need a big proposal to match it. it also gives you some room for compromise. there's a great line in robert caro's latest biography of johnson. they're talking about how big to be on civil rights and one of the so-called wise men goes to johnson and basically said that's not practical. i
government that is very, very sensitive on the subject of terrorism. it fought a brutal, with a capital b, civil war during the 1990s and 50,000 to 200,000 people were killed. violence all across the country fighting the armed islamic group and the -- another islamic group in the country. so it is very sensitive. doesn't want to negotiate at all. but we understand that it is giving in to japanese as well as american pressure and saying we're trying to talk to them. the americans and japanese are saying put the lives of the hostages first. >> the real question, which i know you don't have an answer to is the why. why do they do this? we talked about the fact that this facility, there were a lot of western -- >> that's your answer too. there are a lot of westerns there. money could have been -- it may have been planned for monetary purposes because a lot of people think this wasn't just put up in the last week. this was well planned over a period of time. but it was executed over the last week. and there is a lot of security forces in the area, people there to protect those workers, but obv
the decision in the senate. when you give up that responsibility you give up your ability to govern and i think that's the problem. >> i want to ask you all what this means for the legislative agenda of this house going forward right after we take a break. ou make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. some of the ones that push mutual funds with their names on them -- aren't. why? because selling their funds makes them more money. which makes you wonder -- isn't that a conflict? am i in the best fund for me, or them? search "proprietary mutual funds". yikes, it's best for them. then go to e-trade. we've got over 8,000 mutual funds and not one of them has our name on it. why? because that's not the business we're in. we're in the business of finding the right investments for you. e-trade. less for us. more for you. star
of government for all time. but it does require us to act in our time. for now, decisions are upon us. and we cannot afford delay. we cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or substitute spectacle for progress, or treat name-calling as debate. we must act, we must act knowing that our work will be imperfect. we must act knowing that today's victories will be only partial, and it will be up to those who stand here in four years, and 40 years, to advance the timeless spirit once conferred to us in a spare philadelphia hall. >> johnathan capehart, i have a prediction, the next inaugural address will not be as good. nobody is going to have the effect he has, nobody will have the poetry. >> we say that now, when bill clinton was president, they said there wouldn't be anybody else who can delivery a speech like him. and now, we have president obama who in how many minutes was that? 18 minutes he packed in a lot of power in words, in flourishes, excuse me, i wrote about this today, the most powerful moment in that speech among many was when he mentioned the word, stonewall, talking about the flash
to govern gun purchases. president also says he wants a law to limit ammunition magazines to a maximum of ten rounds. and perhaps the most controversial here, the president is asking for a nationwide ban on military style rifles known as assault weapons. as an example of the resistance the president is certainly bound to face here, today the national rifle association released this video ad that drags the president's own daughters into the gun debate here. the president said today, he cannot fight this one alone. >> if parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, if hunters and sports men, if responsible gun owners, if americans of every background stand up and say enough, we suffered too much pain, and care too much about our children to allow this to continue, then change will come. >> but what about the constitution? what about the second amendment? a lot of folks i know are asking and the president had an answer for that. >> as americans we are endowed by our creator with certain inalienable rights to no man or government can take away from us. but we also have long recognize
be targets for being struck down by a court? >>> there's the completely anti government wing that will make that argument. i guess they made it against president bush 41 when he banned the importation of certain kind of assault weapons and made it against executive order signed by president clinton. presidents have the power to do executive orders. that's a power deferred to the president by congress and the constitution. there are those -- as rand paul says, he wants to nullify. that's code word. >> for what? >> nullification, look when it's been used. it's kind of a state's rights argument that gets used in times of great controversy. but the president is acting by executive power, legally conf conferred on him these executive orders are basically common-sense things, basically geared around sharing information, sharing information to reduce gun violence. >> null if i is a code word, usually some endgame to the code. >> we'll see what it is. the notion that we'll nullify presidential action when the president is acting pursuant to law, that's kind of this anti government rhetoric that i'm
is in constant contact with the government of algeria and has been clear that our first priority is the safety and security of the hostages. defense secretary leon panetta says, he's putting the terrorists on notice. >> they will find no sanctuary, no refuge, not in algeria, not in north africa, not anywhere. >> but the demands of the group led by mokhtar belmokhtar is growing. they are demanding the release of omar currently serving a life sentence in the u.s. and a pakistani neuroscientist now in prison in the u.s. convicted of trying to kill u.s. soldiers and fbi agents in afghanistan. the obamaed administration, however, is ruling out any negotiating with the terrorists. >> the united states does not negotiate with terrorists. >> again, this is an ongoing operation as far as we know, still conflicting information for a third day in exactly what is happening, how many people have been released, et cetera. but, wolf, you can certainly say that the countries that are involved and that includes japan, have been talking around the clock nonstop about this and coordinating their activities, whi
's government has spurred heavy investment in inf infrastructure. >> "usa today." congress, inexperienced. 40% of lawmakers in the house have fewer than three years' experience. the lowest number since at least 1995. as a result, new members are often receiving committee assignments that previously took years to achieve. >>> from our "parade of papers," "the dallas morning news." inspectors say recently examined levee systems are at risk of failure in 37 states. the affected systems are in every region of the country and impact some 10 million people. the inspectors rated 326 levees in need of urgent repair. >> pauline phillips, the woman who began the dear abby column has died. she was known as sympathetic yet tart tone. she died wednesday in minneapolis after living with alzheimer's for more than a decade. she was 94. and i truly wonder how many people under who years old know who that is. >> the question is who do i write to now? heilmann? >> miss manners. >> that's right. >> she's got a lot of good advice. >> "portland oregonian." a portland woman declines how to say she got trapped betwe
fight over obama care. >> the fascism in government doesn't own the means of production but they do control it, and that's what's happening with these reforms. >> i'll talk with jonathan alter about fascism and the founder of whole foods. ♪ [ male announcer ] finally, mom's oven-baked tastes straight from the microwave. like oven-roasted chicken in a creamy alfredo sauce. marie callender's new comfort bakes. it's time to savor. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. if you're still ha
there is from u.s. officials about the way the algerian government has handled the situation, particularly not informing the u.s. or other governments about this operation before it began. >> exactly. they did not get any notice. the british said it, the united states said it. there was frustration also in the lack of information, the lack of clarity, conflicting information that was given. but the other part of it is, you know, algeria has been useful in the war against terror, and they have, of course, given overflight to france to go into mali. so they are useful, but the techniques they use would not be the techniques certainly that some western governments would use or western militaries would use. they are more brutal. they're not -- they don't -- >> more plunt. >> -- take their time coming in. >> less surgical if that's the right term. jill dougherty, i appreciate you working your sources late into the night for us. we appreciate it. we're going to be right back. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply sto
reports from the algerian government that at least 23 foreign hostages and dozens of their captors have been killed. it's still not clear how many americans may have been held at the facility. >> with regard to the numbers of americans, we are still trying to get accurate information about just exactly how many americans were located there, and exactly what happened to them. >> we're going to get live to the state department in just a moment. but back here in washington, the president and the vice president recognized today is a national day of service, leading up to the martin luther king holiday. the president and the first lady showed up at the burrville elementary school in washington to help in some service projects as a way to celebrate the life of a civil rights leader. >> the fact that we've got some outstanding young people here today, i want to say thank you to the parents for showing early on to all our young people how gratifying and how fulfilling this is. this is really what america is about. this is what we celebrate. >> the vice president and his family also volunteered,
of government for all time, but it does require us to act in our time. >> good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. this was a big deal. in the 57th formal inauguration of an american president, barack obama delivered one of the most progressive speeches ever given by a commander in chief. with more than a million people in attendance, the president took the ceremonial oath of office on the steps of the united states capitol. president obama did not set out to lower expectations of his second term. instead, he established the goals of a progressive agenda. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it, so long as we seize it together. for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. >> themes of unity, togetherness, and helping our fellow man rang throughout the president's second inaugural address. he did not shy away from our moral obligation to each other either
of the governing fights in washington. >> absolutely. it is quite likely that there will be some give and some compromise. but he is creating a bottom line here beyond which he will not go. and that is a very strong signal for these budget fights to come. but writ more broadly, i was thinking of martin luther king jr. and of equal rights and of the refrain that, you know, our job is not done, what he basically was saying is our journey is not complete, to use his words. >> our journey is not complete. those are the two repeated phrases. our journey is not complete, and you and i as citizens, you and i. >> exactly. this is an inclusive moment. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are recognized as equal under the law. he is talking about doma, the supreme court argument to come. he is surrounded by the supreme court right there. and he talked about stonewall. talking about stonewall in an inaugural address, i was really profoundly moved by that. this is not just saying okay, these people helped elect me. this is saying this is a commitment. we're expanding the vision o
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